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The Native population is about 1.4% of the total population in Oregon. American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) and Hawaiian Native students are potentially in every classroom and every district. Oregon is a national leader in adopting a comprehensive plan developed by Native education leaders. The 2020-2025 AI/AN Student Success Plan aligns to the strategic goals and key efforts of the Oregon Department of Education. The 2020-2025 plan focuses on eleven (11) educational objectives with accompanying strategies and measurable outcomes.

The Oregon Department of Education promotes active Tribal communication through the Indian Education Advisor to the Deputy Superintendent. Executive Order 96-30 was issued by the Governor of the State of Oregon in 1996, it established State Government-to-Government Relations with the nine (9) federally recognized Tribes in Oregon. The purpose of the formal relationship was to improve services and develop avenues for consultation. Under EO 96-30 the Government to Government Education Cluster was established.

Part C Title VI of the “Every Student Succeeds Act” (ESSA) of 2015 details the national expectations to provide a quality education for American Indian, Alaska and Hawaiian Native students. There are federal grant programs to 1) support the efforts of local educational agencies to meet the culturally related educational needs of Native students so such students can meet academic standards; 2) ensure that students gain knowledge and understanding of Native communities, languages, Tribal histories, traditions and cultures, and 3) to ensure that school staff who serve Native students have the ability to provide culturally appropriate and effective instruction

Start Here: Tribal Communities in Oregon Primer

Essential Understandings of Native Americans in the Field

The ODE partnered with representatives of the nine federally recognized Tribal governments in Oregon to create the Essential Understandings of Native Americans in Oregon. These nine essential understandings have been created to serve as an introduction into the vast diversity of the Oregon Native American experience.

Postcards From the Field

Dispatches from the field of our Tribal Education Partners

Standing Strong The Tribal Nations of Western Oregon

As part of the Oregon 150 celebration, this video tracing the history of Oregon Tribes residing in the western part of the state was produced by the Western Oregon Tribal OR150 Committee. The video provides both an historical perspective and current information on five of the nine federally recognized Tribes in Oregon. The western Tribes in Oregon are: the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians, the Coquille Indian Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians, the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde, and the Confederated Tribes of the Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians. Students studying Oregon history or teachers preparing classes on Oregon history will find this video very informative.

Oregon's Tribal Communities

State Tribal Members
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Federally Recognized Tribes
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Total Tribes in Oregon
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Self-identified Tribal Members*
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* According to the 2020 U.S. Census, more than 185,000 Oregonians identify as “American Indian or Alaska Native,” representing numerous other Tribes and bands from across the country. Portland, in particular, boasts the ninth largest Urban Indian population in the United States.

Federally Recognized Tribes of Oregon

Burns Paiute Tribe

The Burns Paiute Reservation is located in rural Eastern Oregon. The Burns Paiute Tribe is primarily comprised of the descendants of the Wadatika Band of Northern Paiutes. The traditional homelands of the Burns Paiute include 5,250 square miles of land in Central-Southeastern Oregon, Northern Nevada, Northwestern California and W​estern Idaho. The Burns Paiute still maintain aboriginal title to much of their aboriginal territory. The Tribe currently has 402 enrolled members of which 142 people call the reservation their home.

Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians

The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians are made up of three Tribes (four bands): Two bands of Coos Tribes: Hanis Coos (Coos Proper) and ​Miluk Coos; Lower Umpqua Tribe; and Siuslaw Tribe.

Although both Coos bands lived in close proximity to one another on the Coos River tributaries, they spoke different dialects of the Coos language and had their own unique history and cultural differences. The diversity of languages and cultures you can find along the West Coast attests to the longevity these bands sustained for hundreds of generations in the lands they call ho​​me. The Tribes trace their ancestry back to the aboriginal inhabitants of the South-Central coast of Oregon. Their historic homelands extended from the richly forested slopes of the Coastal Range in the east to the rocky shoreline of the Pacific Ocean in the west, a vast region of some 1.6 million acres. Their service area is made up of Coos, Curry, Lincoln, Douglas and Lane counties.​​​​

Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde

The Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon is a federally recognized Tribe that includes over 30 Tribes and bands from Western Oregon, Northern California, and Southwest Washington. Since time immemorial Tribal people have relied on these traditional landscapes for their livelihood. The fish and game were plentiful and what the lands didn’t provide, they acquired by trade. This way of life changed with western expansion. Ratified and unratified treaties between the Tribes and the United States Government from 1853 through 1855 resulted in the forced removal of Tribal members from their ancestral homelands.

The Tribe is active throughout its ancestral homelands but located in Western Oregon, where it has a 11,500-acre reservation in Yamhill County. The ​Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon includes Tribal bands from the Kalapuya, M​​olalla, Chasta, Umpqua, Rogue River, Chinook and Tillamook. With approximately 5,400 enrol​led Tribal members, the Tribe is governed by a nine-member Tribal Council that is elected by the Tribe’s voting membership.​

Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians

The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians is a federally recognized confederation of 27 bands, originating from Northern California to Southern Washington. The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians include Clatsop, Chinook, Klickitat, Molala, Kalapuya, Tillamook, Alsea, Siuslaw/Lower Umpqua, Coos, Coquelle, Upper Umpqua, Tututni (including all the lower Rogue River bands and those extending up the coast to Floras Creek and down to Whales Head), Chetco (including all of the villages from Whales Head to the Winchuck River), Tolowa, Takelma (including the Illinois Valley/mid-Rogue River and Cow Creek peoples), Galice/Applegate ​and Shasta.

Each of these T​ribes has a unique individual history, culture and legal relationship with the federal government, which was brought to be incorporated into the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians. Ancestors of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz spoke at least 10 different base languages. Termi​nation was imposed upon the Siletz by the United States government in 1955. In November 1977, they were the first Tribe in Oregon and second in the United States to be fully restored to federal recognition. The Tribe manages a 3,666-acre reservation located in Lincoln County, Oregon.​​

Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) is a union of three Tribes: Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla. The CTUIR has over 3,100 Tribal members. Nearly half of those Tribal members live on or near the ​Umatilla Re​servation located in Northeaster Oregon near Pendelton. The Umatilla Indian Reservation is about 172,000 acres (about 273 square miles). CTUIR is governed by a Constitution and bylaws adopted in 1949. The governing body is the nine-member Board of Trustees, elected every two years by the General Council.

In 1855, the three Tribes signed a treaty with the U.S. government, in which it ceded over 6.4 million acres to the United States. In the treaty, the Tribes reserved rights to fish, hunt ​and gather foods and medicines such as roots and berries, and pasture livestock on unclaimed lands. Tribal members continue to exercise these rights throughout the CTUIR’s area of traditional use, which extends to and beyond harvesting fish at Willamette Falls in ​Western Oregon to hunting buffalo in the Greater Yellowstone area, as they have since time immemorial.​

Confederated Tribes of Warm Springs

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) is a union of three Tribes: Cayuse, Umatilla and Walla Walla. The CTUIR has over 3,100 Tribal members. Nearly half of those Tribal members live on or near the ​Umatilla Re​servation located in Northeaster Oregon near Pendelton. The Umatilla Indian Reservation is about 172,000 acres (about 273 square miles). CTUIR is governed by a Constitution and bylaws adopted in 1949. The governing body is the nine-member Board of Trustees, elected every two years by the General Council.

In 1855, the three Tribes signed a treaty with the U.S. government, in which it ceded over 6.4 million acres to the United States. In the treaty, the Tribes reserved rights to fish, hunt ​and gather foods and medicines such as roots and berries, and pasture livestock on unclaimed lands. Tribal members continue to exercise these rights throughout the CTUIR’s area of traditional use, which extends to and beyond harvesting fish at Willamette Falls in ​Western Oregon to hunting buffalo in the Greater Yellowstone area, as they have since time immemorial.​

Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians

The Cow Creek Tribal Nation, located in Southwestern Oregon, has over 1,800 members who are governed by an elected eleven-member council known as the Tribal Board of Directors. The Cow Creek Tribe has a rich history in southern Oregon that reflects hard work, perseverance and the desire to be self-reliant. The Cow Creek Tribe never received the reservation their Treaty promised. Even without a reservation, the people remained in their homelands. The Tribal Government Office, located in Roseburg, Oregon, ​houses not only the Tribal Government body and programs, bu​t also the Cow Creek Tribal Gaming Commission and the Cow Creek Health and Wellness Center.​​​

Coquille Indian Tribe

The Coquille Tribe has more than 1,100 members and has regained more than 10,000 acres of their ancestral homeland. Comprising a people whose ancestors lived in the lands of the Coquille River watershed and lower Coos Bay, the Coquille Indian Tribe’s service area covers 15,603 square miles of Coos, Curry, Douglas, Jackson and Lane counties. Approximately 350 Tribal members live in Coos County. After the United States reinstituted federal recognition to the Tribe and restored its full sovereignty rights in 1989, the Coquille Tribal government created an administrative program that now provides housing, health care, education, elder care, law enforcement and judicial services to its members.

Klamath Tribes

The Klamath Tribes consist of the Klamath, Modoc and Yahooskin Peoples. The present-day Klamath Indian Reservation consists of 12 ​small, non-contiguous parcels of land in Klamath County. These fragments are generally located in and near the communities of Chiloquin and Klamath Falls. The Tribes have established comprehensive unity by fostering the enhancement of spiritual and cultural values through a government whose function is to protect human and cultural resources and treaty rights, and to provide for the development and delivery of social and economic opportunities. There are over 5,700 enrolled members in the Klamath Tribes, with the government headquarters centered in Klamath County, Oregon.

PARTNERS WORKING FOR STUDENT SUCCESS

CCL Tribal Communities Contacts

Susan Samek

Title: Career Connected Learning Systems Navigator

Role Description: The Career Connected Learning Systems Navigator connects educational programs with career development, collaborating with schools and industry to provide students with diverse career learning opportunities.

Phone Number: 971-208-0096

E-mail: susan.samek@ode.oregon.gov

April Campbell

Title: Assistant Superintendent | Office of Indian Education

Role Description: This role involves ensuring the delivery of culturally relevant education, fostering partnerships with tribes and tribal education departments, and implementing policies and programs that enhance educational opportunities and outcomes for Native American youth. The focus is on advocating for equity, supporting cultural preservation, and addressing the unique educational needs and challenges faced by Native American communities.

Phone Number: Coming Soon!

E-mail: april.campbell@ode.oregon.gov

Renee Roman Nose

Title: Native American Student Success Coordinator | Office of Indian Education

Role Description: The Native American Student Success Coordinator at the Office of Indian Education focuses on developing and implementing strategies to enhance the educational outcomes and overall success of Native American students. This role typically involves collaborating with schools, communities, and tribal entities to support culturally responsive education, providing resources and guidance to educators, and advocating for policies and practices that meet the unique needs of Native American students.

Phone Number: Coming Soon!

E-mail: renee.romannose@ode.oregon.gov

Brent Spencer

Title: Indian Education Coordinator | Office of Indian Education

Role Description: An Indian Education Coordinator at the Office of Education develops and manages programs aimed at supporting the educational needs and cultural preservation of Native American students. This role includes liaising with schools, tribal communities, and educators to integrate culturally relevant curricula, facilitate access to educational resources, and promote policies that ensure a supportive learning environment for Native American youth, focusing on both academic achievement and cultural identity reinforcement.

Phone Number: Coming Soon!

E-mail: brent.spencer@ode.oregon.gov

Neil Taylor

Title: Education Manager | Burns Paiute Tribe

Role Description: The Education Manager at the Burns Paiute Tribe is focused on providing educational, career development, and lifelong learning opportunities for all Tribal members. The program prioritizes quality teaching, strong teacher-student relationships, local leadership partnerships, and place-based solutions, emphasizing performance, accountability, and data-driven action. The tribe also offers virtual tutoring for elementary to high school students and accepts applications for higher education programs.

Phone Number: Coming Soon!

E-mail: neil.taylor@burnspaiute-nsn.gov

Jemiah Wassman

Title: Director of Education at The Confederated Tribes of Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Indians

Role Description: The CTCLUSI Director of Education oversees programs that assist Tribal Members in achieving their educational goals. This includes providing case management, financial support for college and technical schooling, scholarships, and youth activities. The department is committed to blending traditional learning with western education principles to support the community’s educational and vocational aspirations. For more information, you can explore their programs and services here.

Phone Number: 541-888-1318

E-mail: jwassman@ctclusi.org

Alissa Lane-Keene

Title: Education & Cultural Programs Director | The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians

Role Description: The Education & Cultural Programs Director at the Confederated Tribes of Siletz is responsible for designing, developing, and implementing a wide range of programs and services. These aim to fulfill the Tribe’s educational and cultural goals, including childcare, language learning, pow-wow, and education services, catering to the community’s diverse needs. For more detailed information, you can explore their initiatives and services here.

Phone Number: Coming Soon!

E-mail: alissaL@ctsi.nsn.us

Angela Fasana

Title: Education Department Manager | Confederated Tribes of Grande Ronde

Role Description: The Education Department Manager at the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde oversees a broad spectrum of educational programs aimed at fostering lifelong learning among tribal members of all ages. These programs range from early childhood education and language immersion to higher education support and youth enrichment activities, all designed to meet the community’s educational, cultural, and professional needs while preserving the tribe’s heritage and values.

Phone Number: 503-879-2284

E-mail: fasanaa@wou.edu

Jaimie Crane

Title: Director of Education at The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

Role Description: The Director of Education at the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation leads programs aimed at the academic, cultural, and personal growth of tribal members. They focus on language preservation, cultural practices, and providing various educational services, including scholarships and vocational training. This role embodies the mission of practicing Tribal ways and preserving knowledge for future generations.

Phone Number: 541-429-7819

E-mail: eduinfo@ctuir.org

Jesse Jackson

Title: Education Programs Officer | Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians

Role Description: The Education Programs Officer at the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe of Indians oversees a variety of educational programs. These include continuing education, higher education funding, book reimbursements, and programs for youth education, catering to different educational stages and needs. The officer ensures these programs support the tribal members in their educational journeys

Phone Number: 541-677-5575

E-mail: jesse.jackson@cowcreek-nsn.gov

Bridgett Wheeler

Title: Director of the Culture, Education, and Library Services Program | The Coquille Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation

Role Description: The Director of the Culture, Education, and Library Services Program at the Coquille Indian Tribe oversees programs focused on educational development, cultural preservation, and library services. This role is vital in maintaining the tribe’s heritage, providing educational resources, and supporting the community’s lifelong learning and cultural engagement.

Phone Number: 541-756-0904

E-mail: bridgettwheeler@coquilletribe.org

Julie Bettles

Title: Education Department Director | Klamath Tribes

Role Description: This role involves managing resources, coordinating educational services, and ensuring access to opportunities for lifelong learning. While specific details about current initiatives or programs weren’t accessible, typically, such a position would focus on cultural education, higher learning support, vocational training, and potentially language preservation efforts within the tribe.

Phone Number: 541-783-2219

E-mail: julie.bettles@klamathtribes.com

Essential Links for Educators

ASPIRE - Oregon Student Aid

ASPIRE – Oregon Student Aid. The ASPIRE program helps educate Oregon students to become career and college ready. ASPIRE offers education, resources and mentoring opportunities for all students.

ASPIRE | Oregon Student Aid
Career Connect Oregon - Curriculum for Educators

Career Connect Oregon – Curriculum for Educators offers curriculum suites aligned with ASCA standards and OARs. Suites include quick-start guides, lesson plans, and handouts. Cooperative learning strategies and creative assessment ideas included in each suite!

View Career Connect Oregon Page
Workforce Talent Development Board

Workforce Talent Development Board provides a productive space for educators to engage and partner with one another that includes innovative task forces, research projects, data and reports, strategies and recommendations.

Link to CTE Educator Resources

"Understanding ESSA" Every Student Succeeds Act Toolkit

Understanding ESSA | a Toolkit for Tribal Consultation: “This toolkit is designed for our LEAs and the nine federally recognized tribes of Oregon. The purpose of this toolkit is to provide a resource to school districts, particularly those who receive greater than $40K in Title VI funding or have 50% or more American Indian/Alaska Native+ students. This toolkit is rooted in the belief that the voices of the nine federally recognized Tribes of Oregon in district school improvement planning is critical to improving outcomes and creating safe and welcoming learning environments where all students can thrive. Serving as an equity lever, consultation offers opportunity to co-create school and district plans and establish and strengthen partnerships with Tribes throughout Oregon communities.”

Link to Toolkit

Essential Links for Students

Career OneStop

Career OneStop Take this 30-question interest assessment to help you match your interests with exciting careers.

Link to Interest Assessment | Career OneStop
Career Journeys

Career Journeys Watch young Oregonians in high-demand trades share their career journeys and give you a window into their workday.

Watch the Career Journeys Stories
Oregon Career Pathways

Oregon Career Pathways: Explore career pathways through the Oregon Employment Department to understand the education and training needed for different occupations. Learn which jobs are in highest demand and what they pay.

Oregon Career Pathways
Central Oregon Community College Native American Student Program

Native American Student Program: “Our purpose is to help ensure a successful college experience for Native American students. We provide support services, culturally enriching activities, academic advising and registration assistance. Another function of the Native American Program (NAP) is to bring forth concerns and recommendations and act upon them to foster a welcoming and positive learning environment. In addition the program works to increase understanding of Native American issues both on campus and beyond.”

COCC Native American Student Program
Career and Technical Education

Career and Technical Education: Oregon Department of Education offers programs and resources for students interested in technical and vocational education. Learn more about the 6 career areas and find programs in your school.

Career and Technical Education: State of Oregon
Oregon Apprenticeship

Oregon Apprenticeship: This website offers information on registered apprenticeship and pre-apprenticeship programs, helping students explore hands-on training opportunities in various trades statewide.

Oregon Apprenticeships
Training Corps

Training Corps: For students interested in environmental careers, OCC provides opportunities for training and work experience in conservation. Get paid to learn at AmeriCorps, JobCorps, and YouthCorps while serving in communities across Oregon and the US.

Link to Oregon Conservation Corps
Link to AmeriCorps
Link to YouthCorps
Oregon Tribal Student Grant

The Oregon Tribal Student Grant provides funding for eligible Oregon tribal students to offset the cost of attendance at eligible Oregon colleges and universities. Current, new and continuing students are encouraged to apply for this grant for the 2023-24 academic year. The grant is intended to cover the average cost of attendance after all federal and state grants/scholarships have been applied.

New applicants are encouraged to complete the Oregon Tribal Student Grant application and 2023-24 FAFSA or ORSAA at the earliest point possible. Renewal applicants (those who received the grant in 2022-23) must log into their OSAC Student Portal account and re-apply for 2023-24 Oregon Tribal Student Grant. The final deadline to apply for the 2023-24 Oregon Tribal Student Grant is April 5, 2024. The 2024-2025 Oregon Tribal Student Grant will be opening in April 2024 after the closing of the 2023-2024 application.”

Link to Oregon Tribal Student Grant

Essential Links for Families & Guardians

Search CTE Programs Across the State

Search CTE Programs Across the State. Curious about what Career and Technical Education (CTE) programs are available? Visit this link for a database of searchable CTE programs at every high school in Oregon.

Link to Approved CTE Programs (Detail)
Oregon Young Employee Safety

Oregon Young Employee Safety strives to prevent injury and illnesses and promote well-being among young workers through resource sharing and community partnership.

Oregon YES
Oregon Career Information System

Oregon Career Information System provides career exploration and planning tools. Parents can access resources to help their children explore different career paths.

Oregon CIS
Smoke Signals: Independent Tribal Media

Smoke Signals “is the independent Tribal newspaper of the Confederated Tribes of Grand Ronde. Smoke Signals became part of the Tribe’s Public Affairs Department in 2005. During its lifetime and through numerous staff changes, Smoke Signals has won many journalism awards from the Native American Journalists Association and Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association. On February 1, 1995, Smoke Signals changed from being a monthly publication to being published twice a month, approximately on the first and 15th of each month. The twice-monthly publication schedule continues to this day. Staff members also are responsible for producing the Tribe’s Annual Report, calendar and Resource Directory, as well as supervising new media endeavors, such as the Tribal Reader Board and social media outlets on Twitter and Facebook.”

Smoke Signals Home Page
Oregon Student Aid

Oregon Student Aid: The Higher Education Coordinating Commission offers information on higher education options in Oregon, including college and university programs.

Plan & Pay for College – Find Oregon Colleges, Universities, and Programs
Personal Education Plan and Profile

Personal Education Plan and Profile: Find out more about this document for secondary students—updated yearly—that contains their interests, coursework, career aspirations, participation in career-related learning and a portfolio of their achievements.

Education Plan and Profile
Oregon C3 Career Journey Maps

Oregon C3 Career Journey Maps are centered around 16 major career clusters and designed to encourage discussion among practitioners, students and their families. Each map includes sample jobs, general specifications, job descriptions, suggestions for preparation, links to additional resources and suggestions for next steps.

Career Journey Maps | C3 Oregon

Essential Links for Community Partners

CTE Programs Database

Search CTE Programs Across the State: Visit this link for a database of searchable CTE Approved CTE Programs offered in Oregon’s high schools. There are two report options available; a Basic Search that displays program information for one secondary school offering CTE within the selected academic year and an Advanced Search that contains additional filtering options allowing users to explore results across, regions, counties, or career areas.

CTE Programs Database
Workforce Talent Development Board - Employer Resources

Workforce Talent Development Board – Employer Resources: Post your job openings, identify qualified candidates and plan for the future of your employees. The majority of the Workforce Talent Development Board is made up of Oregon business leaders from Healthcare, Advanced Manufacturing, Information Technology, Energy, Sports and Apparel, Forest Products, Food and Beverage, and other sectors. The WTDB provides multiple tables, convenings and events for these leaders, and their public sector partners, to develop and drive strategy, policy and value for Oregon’s workforce system.

Link to Workforce Talent Development Board Resources
WorkSource Oregon

WorkSource Oregon: Grow your skilled workers with apprenticeships, internships and training options. WorkSource Oregon is here to partner with your business and provides free services for employers and helps businesses craft job postings for improved results, convene job candidates through job fairs and hiring events. They can also help your business identify possible tax credits, provide customized workforce data analysis, and establish market-competitive wage rates to attract and retain talent.

Link to WorkSource Oregon
Oregon Apprenticeship

Oregon Apprenticeship: Apprenticeships are an excellent way to invest in your community’s young workforce. They compliment classroom learning, ensure a trained and engaged staff, and contribute to worker satisfaction and retention. For details on how your business can participate, follow the link below:

Oregon Apprenticeship
Mapping CTE, STEM, and Workforce Education in Oregon

Mapping CTE, STEM and Workforce Education in Oregon This interactive story map shows how five groups promote career-connected learning and develop job skills across the state. The following maps allow you to interact with Oregon’s Community College Districts, Career and Technical Education (CTE) Partnerships, Education Service Districts, Regional science, technology, engineering, mathematics (STEM) Hubs and Local Workforce Boards.

Mapping the Landscape of CTE, STEM, and Workforce Education
Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industries

Oregon Bureau of Labor & Industries Minors, their parents and employers should know about the laws that protect children at work. They include hiring and working conditions that are specific to minors, restrictions on the hours and the types of work a minor can do.

BOLI TA Child Labor Law Summaries and Fact Sheet

Tribal Communities Education Partners and Locations

CCL Places

Connect with the CCL Team Using the Form Below: